Last edited by Tokora
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Carthaginian voyage to West Africa in 500 B.C. found in the catalog.

Carthaginian voyage to West Africa in 500 B.C.

Palmer, Herbert Richmond Sir

Carthaginian voyage to West Africa in 500 B.C.

together with Sultan Mohammed Bello"s account of the origin of the Fulbe

by Palmer, Herbert Richmond Sir

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Published by J.M. Lawani in Bathurst, Gambia .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Africa -- Discovery and exploration.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby H.R. Palmer.
    ContributionsMuhammad Bello, Sultan of Sokoto, d. 1837.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 51 p. ; 25 cm.
    Number of Pages51
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17918332M

    Start studying Western Civ - Chapters Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Definition of Carthaginian in the dictionary. Meaning of Carthaginian. What does Carthaginian mean? Information and translations of Carthaginian in the most comprehensive dictionary definitions resource on the web.

    (England); and they were also the first civilised people that ever visited the Gold Coast. They went to both places in order to trade for metal: to Africa for gold, to Britain for tin. About 50o B.C. a Carthaginian sailor called Hanno made a voyage down the west coast of Africa, .   Now that we can safely say that Pheonicia was atleast partly African and partly West Asian in culture,and follow their move to North West Africa and beyond. Khart Haddast or Carthage was said to be founded at about B.C by Phoenician a legendary Queen Dido who found other people on spot on arrival.

      The Hebrew lexicon is Brown, Driver, Briggs, Gesenius Lexicon; this is keyed to the “Theological Word Book of the. With some background information lets turn back to The Kindgom Of Juda. The Kindgom Of Juda was situated in the bend/CROOK of West Africa in the Benin Slave coast area. History lets us know slaves were taken from that area. (Phoenician Qart hadasht literally “new town”), a slave-owning city-state in North Africa, which subjugated a significant part of coastal North Africa, the southern part of Spain, and a number of islands in the Mediterranean Sea from the seventh to the fourth century b.c. Phoenician colonists from the city of Tyre founded Carthage in b.c. Owing to its convenient geographic location.


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Carthaginian voyage to West Africa in 500 B.C by Palmer, Herbert Richmond Sir Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: History: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hanno. Carthaginian voyage to West Africa in B.C. Bathurst: J.M. Lawani, Govt. Printer, The Carthaginian Voyage to West Africa in B.

C.: Together with Sultan Mohammed Bello's Account of The Origin of the Fulbe Hanno, Muhammad Bello (Sultan of Sokoto) J.M. Lawani, Government Printer, - Africa - 51 pages. Carian) summary of the Periplus of Hanno (c B. Carthaginian) showing Africans trading with foreigners in west Africa.

Dugouts were usually paddled but could also be sailed and it may be relevant that tanga (= sail) seemingly occurs in east Africa as part of Tanganyika (= the major part Tanzania).

However, Skupin (ib.) compares Herodotus on the Sataspes (6 th c. Iranian) voyage along west African coasts and "Hanno" for references to the Pillars of Hercules, the Soloeis promontory, southerly course, locals that flee, etc.

Lacroix (ib.) plus Lendering (ib.) state even more directly that from the original of "Hanno" came the account. Carthage (/ ˈ k ɑːr θ ə dʒ /; Punic: 𐤒𐤓𐤕𐤟𐤇𐤃𐤔𐤕, romanized: Qart-ḥadašt, lit. 'New City'; Latin: Carthāgō) was a Phoenician state that included, during the 7th–3rd centuries BC, its wider sphere of influence known as the Carthaginian empire extended over much of the coast of Northwest Africa as well as encompassing substantial parts of coastal Common languages: Punic, Phoenician.

The Periplus of Hanno, a Voyage of Discovery, Down the West African Coast, By a Carthaginian Admiral, of the Fifth Century B. C: The Greek Text, With a Translation (Classic Reprint) [Schoff, Wilfred H.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

The Periplus of Hanno, a Voyage of Discovery, Down the West African Coast, By a Carthaginian Admiral/5(4). THE PERIPLUS OF HANNO A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY DOWN THE WEST AFRICAN COAST, BY A CARTHAGINIAN ADMIRAL OF THE FIFTH CENTURY B. TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK BY WILFRED H. SCHOFF, a. Secretary of the Commercial Museum, Philadelphia IVith explanatory passages quoted from numerous authors PHILADELPHIA: PUBLISHED BY THE COMMERCIAL.

According to legend, Carthage was founded by the Phoenician Queen Elissa (better known as Dido) sometime around BCE although, actually, it rose following Alexander's destruction of Tyre in BCE. The city (in modern-day Tunisia, North Africa) was originally known as Kart-hadasht (new city) to distinguish it from the older Phoenician city of Utica : Joshua J.

Mark. The Periplus of Hanno; a voyage of discovery down the west African coast Item Preview remove-circle Follow the "All Files: HTTP" link in the "View the book" box to the left to find XML files that contain more metadata about the original images and the derived formats (OCR results, PDF etc.).Pages: The author, who also reigned as king of Carthage from until b.c., was sent out at the head of a large fleet of ships to explore and colonize the northwestern coast of Africa.

He reached as far south as the present-day African state of Gambia, and as he traveled, described the native people he encountered—for all of whom he was without. Start your review of The Periplus Of Hanno: A Voyage Of Discovery Down The West African Coast, By A Carthaginian Admiral Of The Fifth Century () Write a review A.

rated it liked it review of another edition/5. The periplus (literally "a sailing-around") of Hanno the Navigator, a Carthaginian colonist and explorer circa BCE, which recounts his exploration of the West coast of Africa, is one of the earliest surviving manuscript documents listing in order the ports and coastal landmarks, with approximate distances between, that the captain of a vessel could expect to find along a shore.

Richmond Palmer (The Carthaginian Voyage to West Africa ) is one of those pointing up how dangerous the heat would be on this stretch coast that is the western fringes of the Sahara that is an extent of desert as long as that of the Namib seen to have been so dangerous to European ships.

Carthage also plays an important part in Christian history. The most poignant martyrdom of early Christians is that of a young Carthaginian woman, Saint Perpetua. In the city provides the emperor Constantine with his first Christian dispute. In Carthage falls to an Arian Christian.

Hanno, Carthaginian navigator, who probably flourished about B.C. It has been conjectured that he was the son of the Hamilcar who was killed at Himera (), but there is nothing to prove this.

He was the author of an account of a coasting voyage on the west coast of Africa, undertaken for the purpose of exploration and colonization. The Niger River was a central artery for trade that was also conducted across sub-Saharan West Africa using donkeys. → Camel caravans across the Sahara were not yet possible, but considerable long-distance trade did occur in sub-Saharan West Africa.

The traditional founding of Carthage was B.C. by Dido, the beautiful queen from the Phoenician city of Tyre. Tyre was a powerful maritime city that had achieved great wealth through trade. Tyre and other Phoenician city-states formed a "loose" alliance much the same as the Greek city-states.

Himilco, a Carthaginian navigator and explorer, lived during the height of Carthaginian power, the century BC. Himilco is the first known explorer from the Mediterranean Sea to reach the northwestern shores of Europe. Map illustrating the Carthagenian Himilco's voyage to Britain ca B. High North: Carthaginian Exploration of Ireland.

Carthaginian peace definition is - a treaty of peace so severe that it means the virtual destruction of the defeated contestant.

The Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle ( – B.C.) wrote a very intriguing account about how the Carthaginians came across a mysterious desert land. Some researchers suspect it’s a description that may refer to America.

Carthage was a Phoenician city located approximately 18 km northeast of Tunis on the coast of North Africa. Profiles world explorers, from B.C. when Carthaginian explorer Hanno colonized West Africa, to such present-day adventurers as astronaut Neil Armstrong and ocean explorer Sylvia Earle.

Comments (-1).The other known specimen of Carthaginian literature, the twenty-eight volume agricultural encyclopedia of the ex-general Mago, bears a unique status as the only work to have been translated from Punic into Latin by decree of the Roman Senate immediately following the fall of Carthage in B.C.

Mago’s wisdom remained highly-rated throughout.Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact theories speculate about possible visits to or interactions with the Americas, the indigenous peoples of the Americas, or both, by people from Africa, Asia, Europe, or Oceania at a time prior to Christopher Columbus' first voyage to the Caribbean in (i.e.

during any part of the so-called pre-Columbian era). Such contact is accepted as having occurred in.